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Individual Counseling

Counseling is a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a psychiatrist, psychologist or other mental health provider. During counseling, you learn about your condition and your moods, feelings, thoughts and behaviors. Individual Counseling helps you learn how to take control of your life and respond to challenging situations with healthy coping skills.

There are many types of counseling, each with its own approach. The type of counseling that's right for you depends on your individual situation. Psychotherapy is also known as talk therapy, counseling, psychosocial therapy or, simply, therapy.

What To Expect

At the first session, your therapist typically gathers information about you and your needs. You may be asked to fill out forms about your current and past physical and emotional health. It might take a few sessions for your therapist to fully understand your situation and concerns and to determine the best approach or course of action.

The first session is also an opportunity for you to interview your therapist to see if his or her approach and personality are going to work for you. Make sure you understand:

  • What type of therapy will be used

  • The goals of your treatment

  • The length of each session

  • How many therapy sessions you may need

Don't hesitate to ask questions anytime during your appointment. If you don't feel comfortable with the first psychotherapist you see, try someone else. Having a good fit with your therapist is critical for psychotherapy to be effective.

Results

  • Make sure you feel comfortable with your therapist. If you don't, look for another therapist with whom you feel more at ease.

  • Approach therapy as a partnership. Therapy is most effective when you're an active participant and share in decision-making. Make sure you and your therapist agree about the major issues and how to tackle them. Together, you can set goals and measure progress over time.

  • Be open and honest. Success depends on willingness to share your thoughts, feelings and experiences, and to consider new insights, ideas and ways of doing things. If you're reluctant to talk about certain issues because of painful emotions, embarrassment or fears about your therapist's reaction, let your therapist know.

  • Stick to your treatment plan. If you feel down or lack motivation, it may be tempting to skip psychotherapy sessions. Doing so can disrupt your progress. Try to attend all sessions and to give some thought to what you want to discuss.

  • Don't expect instant results. Working on emotional issues can be painful and may require hard work. You may need several sessions before you begin to see improvement.

  • Do your homework between sessions. If your therapist asks you to document your thoughts in a journal or do other activities outside of your therapy sessions, follow through. These homework assignments can help you apply what you've learned in the therapy sessions to your life.

  • If psychotherapy isn't helping, talk to your therapist. If you don't feel that you're benefiting from therapy after several sessions, talk to your therapist about it. You and your therapist may decide to make some changes or try a different approach that may be more effective.

Couples Counseling

Couples therapy is a form of psychotherapy that can help you and your partner improve your relationship. If you are having relationship difficulties, you can seek couples therapy to help rebuild your relationship.
 

“Couples therapy can address a wide range of relationship issues, including recurring conflicts, feelings of disconnection, an affair, issues related to sex, or difficulties due to external stressors,” says Brian Mueller, PhD, a psychologist at Columbia University Medical Center who specializes in couples therapy.
 

Couples therapy can help you at any stage of your relationship, regardless of marital status, age, race, faith, or sexual orientation.

Some forms of this therapy include marriage counselingpremarital counseling, and family therapy. It is typically a short-term form of therapy.

What To Expect

Couples therapy ideally requires participation from you and your partner. However, if your partner is not open to it, you can also opt to do couples therapy alone, to better understand your relationship and how you can improve it.

If you and your partner undertake it together, you may find that one or both of you also need separate therapy sessions to help deal with the issues brought up in couples therapy.

If you or your partner are also dealing with other issues, like substance abuse for instance, your therapist might suggest specialized therapy for treatment.

Couples therapy can help resolve issues related to domestic abuse. However, if you are afraid of your partner or don’t want to be in the relationship anymore, contact the police or a shelter near you for help.

TCS Couples Counseling

Results

Couples therapy can give you and your partner the opportunity to discuss and resolve issues related to several aspects of your relationship, which can include:

  • Roles in the relationship: Couples therapy can help you examine the roles you and your partner play in the relationship and identify unhealthy dynamics. It can also help address differences in expectations.

  • Beliefs and values: Couples therapy can help you and your partner discuss your beliefs, values, and religious sentiments and the implications of these aspects on your daily lives.

  • Finances: Finances can be a major source of conflict in relationships. Couples therapy can help promote open dialogue and transparency around income and spending habits.

  • Time spent together: You and your partner can address issues that have been sabotaging your time together. You can discuss activities that you enjoy doing together and how to make time spent together more enjoyable.

  • Children: If you and your partner are not on the same page about whether or not you want to have children or how you would like to raise them, couples therapy can help you communicate these concerns. It can also help with stressors like difficulty conceiving or adopting children.

  • Familial relationships: Couples therapy can help you and your partner work out issues stemming from conflicts with other family members, like parents, children, and siblings.

  • Sex and intimacy: If you and your partner are having issues related to sex and intimacy, or infidelity, couples therapy can offer a safe space for you to share your feelings and needs.

  • Health issues: Physical or mental health illnesses can be hard on you and your partner. Couples therapy can help you deal with the stress it puts on your relationship.

  • External stressors: Therapy can also help you and your partner deal with conflicts caused by external factors, like work for instance, that can put stress on your relationship.

Couples Counseling
Psychological Testing

Psychological Testing

Psychological testing may sound intimidating, but it’s designed to help you. Psychologists use tests and other assessment tools to measure and observe a patient’s behavior to arrive at a diagnosis and guide treatment.

What To Expect

In many ways, psychological testing and assessment are similar to medical tests. If a patient has physical symptoms, a primary care provider may order X-rays or blood tests to understand what’s causing those symptoms. The results of the tests will help inform develop a treatment plan.

Psychological evaluations serve the same purpose. Psychologists use tests and other assessment tools to measure and observe a patient’s behavior to arrive at a diagnosis and guide treatment.

Psychologists administer tests and assessments for a wide variety of reasons. Children who are experiencing difficulty in school, for example, may undergo aptitude testing or tests for learning disabilities. Tests for skills such as dexterity, reaction time, and memory can help a neuropsychologist diagnose conditions such as brain injuries or dementia.

If a person is having problems at work or school, or in personal relationships, tests can help a psychologist understand whether the person might have issues with anger management or interpersonal skills, or certain personality traits that contribute to the problem. Other tests evaluate whether patients are experiencing emotional disorders such as anxiety or depression.

Psychological Testing TCS

Results

Tests and assessments are two separate but related components of a psychological evaluation. Psychologists use both types of tools to help them arrive at a diagnosis and a treatment plan.

Testing involves the use of formal tests such as questionnaires or checklists. These are often described as “norm-referenced” tests. That simply means the tests have been standardized so that test-takers are evaluated in a similar way, no matter where they live or who administers the test. A norm-referenced test of a child’s reading abilities, for example, may rank that child’s ability compared to other children of similar age or grade level. Norm-referenced tests have been developed and evaluated by researchers and proven to be effective for measuring a particular trait or disorder.

A psychological assessment can include numerous components such as norm-referenced psychological tests, informal tests and surveys, interview information, school or medical records, medical evaluation, and observational data. A psychologist determines what information to use based on the specific questions being asked. For example, assessments can be used to determine if a person has a learning disorder, is competent to stand trial, or has a traumatic brain injury. They can also be used to determine if a person would be a good manager or how well they may work with a team.

One common assessment technique, for instance, is a clinical interview. When a psychologist speaks to a patient about his or her concerns and history, they’re able to observe how the patient thinks, reasons, and interacts with others. Assessments may also include interviewing other people who are close to the patient, such as teachers, coworkers, or family members. (Such interviews, however, would only be performed with written consent from the patient.)

Together, testing and assessment allow a psychologist to see the full picture of a person’s strengths and limitations.

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Life Coaching

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A life coach is someone who counsels and encourages clients through personal or career challenges. A life coach helps guide clients to reach their ultimate goals. Oftentimes, a life coach counsels clients in personal and professional arenas. This means career, personal development, relationships, nutrition, divorce, grief, and even financial wellness. 

What To Expect

It’s important to understand the role a life coach plays. And a lot of the time, that comes down to personalized goals. At TCS, our coaches work with members to create personal and professional development goals. Here are just a few examples of what a coach can do: 

Some life coaches also help with things like romantic relationships, dating, divorce, marriage, and more. 

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Life Coaching
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